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$&$ mines deeper into electro territory than ever before with these two new tracks. Of course the groove is there, but the charge of guitars and cock-rock riffage are gone, here replaced with slow, cone-shredding bass loops for half of “Bass Puppy” and all of “Fuck You Folk Singers.” Both…

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immediacyzine
immediacyzine:

Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler - Slant of Light
Thrill Jockey
@MaryLattimore / @UniformRec / @ThrillJockey

Springtime in the imagination. Cherry blossoms gently budding and cascading across the open architecture of original thought and deviant mind. Light refracting from a tiny oasis, the shimmering waves producing images of the right and left brain colliding.
Some say magic, some say vivid thought. Whatever the device that whisks you away to serenity, it shall be triggered by the deft hands of Mary Lattimore and Jeff Zeigler.
The duo’s first record, Slant of Light, showcases skills acquired via unique touring and recording situations presented to both in recent years. Lattimore’s elegant harp playing isn’t in line with the instrument’s most recent pop dalliances, eschewing radical avant structures for more classical compositions. Zeigler provides the melodic zeitgeist which pushes the album into a headier territory.
Yet neither settle for these roles as Slant of Light unravels. Both are familiar with both spectrums of current musical thought (traditional, grounded pop structures versus boundary breaking exercises); both finding fertile ground in the twosome’s created plane.
But neither is confined to playing one of those defined roles through the album’s four compositions. Lattimore’s gentle harp plays traditional rhythm on “Welsh Corgis in the Snow,” but gets angry and erratic by “Tomorrow is a Million.” Zeigler provides the grounded imagery for the latter, yet floats beyond the clouds through “Echo Sounder.”
What works in favor of Slant of Light is neither has any preconceived expectations based on past creations. Though Lattimore has performed with Thurston Moore and Jarvis Cocker among varied others, those visits to seemingly disparate poles have only gained her freedom from expectation. The same for Zeigler, whose performance and production work with Chris Forsyth to The War on Drugs equally lends him artistic gravitas. It is not wasted on Slant of Light, and album sure to stir the restless imagination in all of us.

immediacyzine:

Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler - Slant of Light

Thrill Jockey

@MaryLattimore / @UniformRec / @ThrillJockey

Springtime in the imagination. Cherry blossoms gently budding and cascading across the open architecture of original thought and deviant mind. Light refracting from a tiny oasis, the shimmering waves producing images of the right and left brain colliding.

Some say magic, some say vivid thought. Whatever the device that whisks you away to serenity, it shall be triggered by the deft hands of Mary Lattimore and Jeff Zeigler.

The duo’s first record, Slant of Light, showcases skills acquired via unique touring and recording situations presented to both in recent years. Lattimore’s elegant harp playing isn’t in line with the instrument’s most recent pop dalliances, eschewing radical avant structures for more classical compositions. Zeigler provides the melodic zeitgeist which pushes the album into a headier territory.

Yet neither settle for these roles as Slant of Light unravels. Both are familiar with both spectrums of current musical thought (traditional, grounded pop structures versus boundary breaking exercises); both finding fertile ground in the twosome’s created plane.

But neither is confined to playing one of those defined roles through the album’s four compositions. Lattimore’s gentle harp plays traditional rhythm on “Welsh Corgis in the Snow,” but gets angry and erratic by “Tomorrow is a Million.” Zeigler provides the grounded imagery for the latter, yet floats beyond the clouds through “Echo Sounder.”

What works in favor of Slant of Light is neither has any preconceived expectations based on past creations. Though Lattimore has performed with Thurston Moore and Jarvis Cocker among varied others, those visits to seemingly disparate poles have only gained her freedom from expectation. The same for Zeigler, whose performance and production work with Chris Forsyth to The War on Drugs equally lends him artistic gravitas. It is not wasted on Slant of Light, and album sure to stir the restless imagination in all of us.